Anvil Logo

Archives
About Us
Contact
Search

 

sponsored by


Hosted by
eROI

ANVIL ARCHIVES

 

1998

July 1998
Since the beginning of time, nobody has seen an industry grow as quickly as the Internet, save perhaps David Hasselhoff's European music career. As the net continues its growth, largely unregulated, many grass roots community groups, government institutions and concerned citizens are crying "Wolf!" over net personal rights violations. In this issue of Anvil, we're going to take a look at Internet security and privacy. What are your rights as a consumer? Marketer? Pedophile? How safe is your credit card number online? We may actually decide to answer a few of these questions. If you aren't 100 percent satisfied with the contents, we will give you a full refund.

June 1998
In the last issue of Anvil, we explored many of the technology issues facing us in the coming Millennium. In this issue, we will explore one of these issues close to hearts of 99 percent of the U.S. population: television. Specifically, the Federally-mandated transition from analog television to digital television (DTV). If you don't know about DTV now, you will shortly. Digital will allow theater quality picture and sound, including high definition (HD) and interactive television. If you ignore it long enough, you could be literally left in the dark early in the next decade. After perusing this issue, you will know how the digital revolution with affect you and what you can do about it.

May 1998
Multimedia. It's the catchphrase of the 90's. But what is it? In this case, we're not referring to a group of reporters or where artwork is created, rather we're talking about electronic media. Most of us have a basic idea of what electronic media means today: audio and video in some sort of combined presentation. In the days before the Web, multimedia was confined to CD-ROMs and video games. With the advancement of bandwidth, standards and technologies, multimedia has exploded on the Web, from interactive games to banner advertising. In this issue of Anvil, we will explore the many facets of modern multimedia.

April 1998
In the last issue of Anvil, we explored many of the technology issues facing us in the coming Millennium. In this issue, we will explore one of these issues close to hearts of 99 percent of the U.S. population: television. Specifically, the Federally-mandated transition from analog television to digital television (DTV). If you don't know about DTV now, you will shortly. Digital will allow theater quality picture and sound, including high definition (HD) and interactive television. If you ignore it long enough, you could be literally left in the dark early in the next decade. After perusing this issue, you will know how the digital revolution with affect you and what you can do about it.

March 1998
As the new Millennium draws near, most of us are thinking "Am I really going to party like it's 1999?" The answer, unfortunately, is no. For many technologists, 2000 is Armageddon, as embedded systems must be modified before they crash. For the remaining population, ignorance is not bliss. In this issue, Anvil takes a look at the Year 2000 Bug or "Y2K."

Back to Archives